Fans unite at Toronto Comicon, meet Degrassi stars

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Fans unite at Toronto Comicon, meet Degrassi stars

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Pop culture event Toronto ComiCon continued to grow this year, the sixth year since its restructuring as a three day program. Beginning on Friday evening, it continued through to Sunday. Organized by the same company as Fan Expo Canada, the event offered exhibitors, retailers, an artist’s alley, and panels.

Cast members from Canadian teen show Degrassi Junior High were among the featured guests at the convention. While the current series in the franchise, best known as Degrassi: The Next Generation, has spawned Broadway star Jake Epstein, rapper Drake, and others, the earlier show including Stacie Mistysyn and Stefan Brogren remains popular, particularly in Canada. Brogren told industry publication Kidscreen: “A part of me thought we would do it for five years and maybe get recognized for a couple of years afterwards and then that would be it. I had no idea it would turn out to be such an important thing in so many people?s lives and not just in Canada, but around the world.”

The current program is now distributed by Netflix, and Brogen remains a cast member as school principal, in addition to being a producer and director.

It was the first time the cast did a convention event. The cast also plan to tour to other conventions in Canada this year.

Also appearing were Robert Picardo, the holographic doctor on Star Trek: Voyager, and Ray Park, Darth Maul in Star Wars: The Phantom Menace.

Panels at the convention focused on topics like steampunk costuming, wig styling, recently rebooted comic Captain Canuck, toy collecting, and the history of comic books in Canada over the decades, in conjunction with Canada’s sesquicentennial year. Cast members from The Sean Ward Show appeared at the event, meeting guests to the convention and hosting a panel about the superhero comedy YouTube channel which has more than 600 million views.

Contents

  • 1 Cosplay highlights
  • 2 Related news
  • 3 Sources
  • 4 External links

Dida and Milan face UEFA charges over Celtic fan incident

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Dida and Milan face UEFA charges over Celtic fan incident

Monday, October 8, 2007

The Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) has investigated Milan and their goalkeeper Dida over the incident with the Celtic fan that led to his substitution against Celtic. A fan ran on to the field immediately after Celtic striker Scott McDonald scored the eventual winning goal and appeared to have slightly touched Dida. Dida ran after the fan for a few steps before falling to the ground. UEFA have already investigated Celtic for lack of security for the same incident.

The charges were based on Article 5 Paragraph 1 of UEFA’s disciplinary regulations, which states that “member associations, clubs, as well as their players, officials and members, shall conduct themselves according to the principles of loyalty, integrity and sportsmanship”.

The case were heard on October 11 by UEFA’s Control and Disciplinary Body. The outcome of these cases were as follows: Celtic FC were fined £25000, 50% of which is kept in a reserve tank and if Celtic have any further problems in two years UEFA will keep it, but if they don’t they will get it back. A.C Milan goalkeeper Nelson de Jesus Silva “Dida” was banned for two games but is appealing. If found guilty he could find himself with a four-game champions league ban.

Football CL: All first leg games of second qualifications round are over

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Football CL: All first leg games of second qualifications round are over

Wednesday, July 27, 2005

First leg of the second qualifications round of UEFA Champions League is now over. Second leg games will be played on August 2 and August 3.

Contents

  • 1 Selected match reports
  • 2 Partizan boycotted by fans
  • 3 All results
  • 4 Sources

The biggest surprise of the leg is probably Artmedia Bratislava’s (also known as Artmedia Petrzalka) easy victory over Glasgow Celtic of 5 – 0. According to IFFHS’ ratings, Celtic is 43rd on the list, while Slovakians are on position 200. [1]

RSC Anderlacht secured an almost certain victory in the second round, as they won 5 – 0 at home against PFC Neftchi.

Another clear favorite is Liverpool, which beat Kaunas in an away game yesterday with a final result of 1 – 3. Kaunas will have to score at least three goals at Anfield next week to stay in game.

Anorthosis made the same result against Trabzonspor, but at home, which can still give Turks realistic hope to make it up next week.

Dudelange lost at home to Rapid Vienna with 1 – 6. Strikers were on a goaling spree in the first ten minutes of the game, leaving Rapid with a steady advantage of 1 – 3. Akagündüz scored his second goal of the game in 16′ for Rapid. Two more goals in the second half secured an easy home game for the Austrians.

Partizan Belgrade managed to beat Moldavian Sheriff at home, with 1 – 0, but the organized fans among 15,000 present at the stadium did not cheer for their team. Fans were protesting against the club management, as they banned any banners from the stadium. Most fans only chanted “Management out!” every few minutes.

Partizan’s stadium has a capacity of 32,710 seats, but last season games avaraged only about 2000 spectators in domestic matches. There is a long standing conflict between Partizan’s fans and the managament, as fans accuse the club leadership of manipulation of club’s funds and favoring certain fan groups.

Tropitone Furniture : Very Easy To Maintain}

Submitted by: Susan Amez

Tropitone Furniture: Important Packages and Economies This Vacation Season

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Advantages of Purchasing tropitone furniture

When you tropitone furniture, you will experience to delight the accompanying advantages:

YouTube Preview Image

1. Product Guarantee. Online dealers provide product warranty to their clients. Because imitation Christmas trees are tacked together in factories, some of them may have some defects, although such example has been very minimal. Nonetheless, online traders even so make it a point to propose their clients warranty with their products.

2. Free/discounted transportation of the product. Because online selling claims the delivery of the product correct to the doorstep of the client, companies tender complimentary transportation depending on the localization of the customer. If not complimentary transportation, discounted sending bills will be put up.

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Christmas Tree in History

Purchasing tropitone furniture is a product of the long account of mans attachment to Christmas trees as one of the great symbolizations of Christmas. When you Purchase tropitone furniture, it is a step nearer to sparing the world’s forested lands from baring, which is the inescapable finale if the unprovoked cutting of coniferous trees for Christmas trees had retained to the immediate.

The existing breed of Christmas trees that are sold online is a far cry from the first imitation Christmas trees that attained function of goose feathers that were dyed green to present it a likeness to the normal variety. The feathers in turn were tied to a piece of wood that processes as the trunk, the feathers being organized in such a manner to resemble the twigs and foliage of a tree.

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Where to tropitone furniture

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About the Author:

Tropitone furniture

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Source:

isnare.com

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G20 protests: Inside a labour march

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G20 protests: Inside a labour march
July 9th, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments
Wikinews accredited reporter Killing Vector traveled to the G-20 2009 summit protests in London with a group of protesters. This is his personal account.

Friday, April 3, 2009

London – “Protest”, says Ross Saunders, “is basically theatre”.

It’s seven a.m. and I’m on a mini-bus heading east on the M4 motorway from Cardiff toward London. I’m riding with seventeen members of the Cardiff Socialist Party, of which Saunders is branch secretary for the Cardiff West branch; they’re going to participate in a march that’s part of the protests against the G-20 meeting.

Before we boarded the minibus Saunders made a speech outlining the reasons for the march. He said they were “fighting for jobs for young people, fighting for free education, fighting for our share of the wealth, which we create.” His anger is directed at the government’s response to the economic downturn: “Now that the recession is underway, they’ve been trying to shoulder more of the burden onto the people, and onto the young people…they’re expecting us to pay for it.” He compared the protest to the Jarrow March and to the miners’ strikes which were hugely influential in the history of the British labour movement. The people assembled, though, aren’t miners or industrial workers — they’re university students or recent graduates, and the march they’re going to participate in is the Youth Fight For Jobs.

The Socialist Party was formerly part of the Labour Party, which has ruled the United Kingdom since 1997 and remains a member of the Socialist International. On the bus, Saunders and some of his cohorts — they occasionally, especially the older members, address each other as “comrade” — explains their view on how the split with Labour came about. As the Third Way became the dominant voice in the Labour Party, culminating with the replacement of Neil Kinnock with Tony Blair as party leader, the Socialist cadre became increasingly disaffected. “There used to be democratic structures, political meetings” within the party, they say. The branch meetings still exist but “now, they passed a resolution calling for renationalisation of the railways, and they [the party leadership] just ignored it.” They claim that the disaffection with New Labour has caused the party to lose “half its membership” and that people are seeking alternatives. Since the economic crisis began, Cardiff West’s membership has doubled, to 25 members, and the RMT has organized itself as a political movement running candidates in the 2009 EU Parliament election. The right-wing British National Party or BNP is making gains as well, though.

Talk on the bus is mostly political and the news of yesterday’s violence at the G-20 demonstrations, where a bank was stormed by protesters and 87 were arrested, is thick in the air. One member comments on the invasion of a RBS building in which phone lines were cut and furniture was destroyed: “It’s not very constructive but it does make you smile.” Another, reading about developments at the conference which have set France and Germany opposing the UK and the United States, says sardonically, “we’re going to stop all the squabbles — they’re going to unite against us. That’s what happens.” She recounts how, in her native Sweden during the Second World War, a national unity government was formed among all major parties, and Swedish communists were interned in camps, while Nazi-leaning parties were left unmolested.

In London around 11am the march assembles on Camberwell Green. About 250 people are here, from many parts of Britain; I meet marchers from Newcastle, Manchester, Leicester, and especially organized-labor stronghold Sheffield. The sky is grey but the atmosphere is convivial; five members of London’s Metropolitan Police are present, and they’re all smiling. Most marchers are young, some as young as high school age, but a few are older; some teachers, including members of the Lewisham and Sheffield chapters of the National Union of Teachers, are carrying banners in support of their students.

Gordon Brown’s a Tory/He wears a Tory hat/And when he saw our uni fees/He said ‘I’ll double that!’

Stewards hand out sheets of paper with the words to call-and-response chants on them. Some are youth-oriented and education-oriented, like the jaunty “Gordon Brown‘s a Tory/He wears a Tory hat/And when he saw our uni fees/He said ‘I’ll double that!'” (sung to the tune of the Lonnie Donegan song “My Old Man’s a Dustman“); but many are standbys of organized labour, including the infamous “workers of the world, unite!“. It also outlines the goals of the protest, as “demands”: “The right to a decent job for all, with a living wage of at least £8 and hour. No to cheap labour apprenticeships! for all apprenticeships to pay at least the minimum wage, with a job guaranteed at the end. No to university fees. support the campaign to defeat fees.” Another steward with a megaphone and a bright red t-shirt talks the assembled protesters through the basics of call-and-response chanting.

Finally the march gets underway, traveling through the London boroughs of Camberwell and Southwark. Along the route of the march more police follow along, escorting and guiding the march and watching it carefully, while a police van with flashing lights clears the route in front of it. On the surface the atmosphere is enthusiastic, but everyone freezes for a second as a siren is heard behind them; it turns out to be a passing ambulance.

Crossing Southwark Bridge, the march enters the City of London, the comparably small but dense area containing London’s financial and economic heart. Although one recipient of the protesters’ anger is the Bank of England, the march does not stop in the City, only passing through the streets by the London Exchange. Tourists on buses and businessmen in pinstripe suits record snippets of the march on their mobile phones as it passes them; as it goes past a branch of HSBC the employees gather at the glass store front and watch nervously. The time in the City is brief; rather than continue into the very centre of London the march turns east and, passing the Tower of London, proceeds into the poor, largely immigrant neighbourhoods of the Tower Hamlets.

The sun has come out, and the spirits of the protesters have remained high. But few people, only occasional faces at windows in the blocks of apartments, are here to see the march and it is in Wapping High Street that I hear my first complaint from the marchers. Peter, a steward, complains that the police have taken the march off its original route and onto back streets where “there’s nobody to protest to”. I ask how he feels about the possibility of violence, noting the incidents the day before, and he replies that it was “justified aggression”. “We don’t condone it but people have only got certain limitations.”

There’s nobody to protest to!

A policeman I ask is very polite but noncommittal about the change in route. “The students are getting the message out”, he says, so there’s no problem. “Everyone’s very well behaved” in his assessment and the atmosphere is “very positive”. Another protestor, a sign-carrying university student from Sheffield, half-heartedly returns the compliment: today, she says, “the police have been surprisingly unridiculous.”

The march pauses just before it enters Cable Street. Here, in 1936, was the site of the Battle of Cable Street, and the march leader, addressing the protesters through her megaphone, marks the moment. She draws a parallel between the British Union of Fascists of the 1930s and the much smaller BNP today, and as the protesters follow the East London street their chant becomes “The BNP tell racist lies/We fight back and organise!”

In Victoria Park — “The People’s Park” as it was sometimes known — the march stops for lunch. The trade unions of East London have organized and paid for a lunch of hamburgers, hot dogs, french fries and tea, and, picnic-style, the marchers enjoy their meals as organized labor veterans give brief speeches about industrial actions from a small raised platform.

A demonstration is always a means to and end.

During the rally I have the opportunity to speak with Neil Cafferky, a Galway-born Londoner and the London organizer of the Youth Fight For Jobs march. I ask him first about why, despite being surrounded by red banners and quotes from Karl Marx, I haven’t once heard the word “communism” used all day. He explains that, while he considers himself a Marxist and a Trotskyist, the word communism has negative connotations that would “act as a barrier” to getting people involved: the Socialist Party wants to avoid the discussion of its position on the USSR and disassociate itself from Stalinism. What the Socialists favor, he says, is “democratic planned production” with “the working class, the youths brought into the heart of decision making.”

On the subject of the police’s re-routing of the march, he says the new route is actually the synthesis of two proposals. Originally the march was to have gone from Camberwell Green to the Houses of Parliament, then across the sites of the 2012 Olympics and finally to the ExCel Centre. The police, meanwhile, wanted there to be no march at all.

The Metropolitan Police had argued that, with only 650 trained traffic officers on the force and most of those providing security at the ExCel Centre itself, there simply wasn’t the manpower available to close main streets, so a route along back streets was necessary if the march was to go ahead at all. Cafferky is sceptical of the police explanation. “It’s all very well having concern for health and safety,” he responds. “Our concern is using planning to block protest.”

He accuses the police and the government of having used legal, bureaucratic and even violent means to block protests. Talking about marches having to defend themselves, he says “if the police set out with the intention of assaulting marches then violence is unavoidable.” He says the police have been known to insert “provocateurs” into marches, which have to be isolated. He also asserts the right of marches to defend themselves when attacked, although this “must be done in a disciplined manner”.

He says he wasn’t present at yesterday’s demonstrations and so can’t comment on the accusations of violence against police. But, he says, there is often provocative behavior on both sides. Rather than reject violence outright, Cafferky argues that there needs to be “clear political understanding of the role of violence” and calls it “counter-productive”.

Demonstration overall, though, he says, is always a useful tool, although “a demonstration is always a means to an end” rather than an end in itself. He mentions other ongoing industrial actions such as the occupation of the Visteon plant in Enfield; 200 fired workers at the factory have been occupying the plant since April 1, and states the solidarity between the youth marchers and the industrial workers.

I also speak briefly with members of the International Bolshevik Tendency, a small group of left-wing activists who have brought some signs to the rally. The Bolsheviks say that, like the Socialists, they’re Trotskyists, but have differences with them on the idea of organization; the International Bolshevik Tendency believes that control of the party representing the working class should be less democratic and instead be in the hands of a team of experts in history and politics. Relations between the two groups are “chilly”, says one.

At 2:30 the march resumes. Rather than proceeding to the ExCel Centre itself, though, it makes its way to a station of London’s Docklands Light Railway; on the way, several of East London’s school-aged youths join the march, and on reaching Canning Town the group is some 300 strong. Proceeding on foot through the borough, the Youth Fight For Jobs reaches the protest site outside the G-20 meeting.

It’s impossible to legally get too close to the conference itself. Police are guarding every approach, and have formed a double cordon between the protest area and the route that motorcades take into and out of the conference venue. Most are un-armed, in the tradition of London police; only a few even carry truncheons. Closer to the building, though, a few machine gun-armed riot police are present, standing out sharply in their black uniforms against the high-visibility yellow vests of the Metropolitan Police. The G-20 conference itself, which started a few hours before the march began, is already winding down, and about a thousand protesters are present.

I see three large groups: the Youth Fight For Jobs avoids going into the center of the protest area, instead staying in their own group at the admonition of the stewards and listening to a series of guest speakers who tell them about current industrial actions and the organization of the Youth Fight’s upcoming rally at UCL. A second group carries the Ogaden National Liberation Front‘s flag and is campaigning for recognition of an autonomous homeland in eastern Ethiopia. Others protesting the Ethiopian government make up the third group; waving old Ethiopian flags, including the Lion of Judah standard of emperor Haile Selassie, they demand that foreign aid to Ethiopia be tied to democratization in that country: “No recovery without democracy”.

A set of abandoned signs tied to bollards indicate that the CND has been here, but has already gone home; they were demanding the abandonment of nuclear weapons. But apart from a handful of individuals with handmade, cardboard signs I see no groups addressing the G-20 meeting itself, other than the Youth Fight For Jobs’ slogans concerning the bailout. But when a motorcade passes, catcalls and jeers are heard.

It’s now 5pm and, after four hours of driving, five hours marching and one hour at the G-20, Cardiff’s Socialists are returning home. I board the bus with them and, navigating slowly through the snarled London traffic, we listen to BBC Radio 4. The news is reporting on the closure of the G-20 conference; while they take time out to mention that Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper delayed the traditional group photograph of the G-20’s world leaders because “he was on the loo“, no mention is made of today’s protests. Those listening in the bus are disappointed by the lack of coverage.

Most people on the return trip are tired. Many sleep. Others read the latest issue of The Socialist, the Socialist Party’s newspaper. Mia quietly sings “The Internationale” in Swedish.

Due to the traffic, the journey back to Cardiff will be even longer than the journey to London. Over the objections of a few of its members, the South Welsh participants in the Youth Fight For Jobs stop at a McDonald’s before returning to the M4 and home.

British TV presenter Rico Daniels tells Wikinews about being ‘The Salvager’

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British TV presenter Rico Daniels tells Wikinews about being ‘The Salvager’
July 9th, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments

Saturday, March 14, 2009

Rico Daniels is a British TV presenter living in France who is known for his two television series — The Salvager — whilst he still lived in the UK and then Le Salvager after he moved to France. Rico has been in a variety of jobs but his passion is now his profession – he turns unwanted ‘junk’ into unusual pieces of furniture. Rico’s creations and the methods used to fabricate them are the subject of the Salvager shows.

Rico spoke to Wikinews in January about his inspiration and early life, future plans, other hobbies and more. Read on for the full exclusive interview, published for the first time:

Woman in Buffalo, New York accidentally sets herself on fire

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Woman in Buffalo, New York accidentally sets herself on fire
July 9th, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments

Tuesday, January 22, 2008

Buffalo, New York — A woman in Buffalo, New York in the United States is in critical condition tonight at Sisters Of Charity Hospital after she accidentally set herself on fire.

The unnamed elderly woman was receiving oxygen for medical problems in her home and lit a cigarette, and the oxygen coming from her mask facilitated the ignition of her clothing, setting her on fire.

Despite her “severe” burns as described by firefighters on radio communications, she was still able to dial the emergency line in the U.S., 911.

In the U.S. only 4% of all residential fires were reportedly caused by smoking materials in 2002. These fires, however, were responsible for 19% of residential fire fatalities and 9% of injuries. The fatality rate due to smoking is nearly four times higher than the overall residential fire rate; injuries are more than twice as likely. Forty percent of all smoking fires start in the bedroom or living room/family room; in 35% of these fires, bedding or upholstered furniture are the items first ignited.

Do It Yourself Dent Removal Tip}

July 6th, 2017 in Cars | No Comments

Do-It-Yourself Dent Removal Tip

by

davudobuya55

To start with, this trick is only for those who are not afraid of welders, grinders and any other tool used in bodywork repair in Manchester. Otherwise, it would be best to call the professionals at Auto Care Assist on0161 274 4830 for assistance. For the brave, here is the secret: It just takes a couple of well-thought-out traditional tricks, mods and methods to gear up your carseparate from the rest.

Take note that factories hold different imports than you have when they create cars. This leaves you with certain panels that arenot as even as they should be, besides generally wanting a great deal of trimming and badging. If you possess a welding tool and not afraid of using it, it is easier to make your car into an absolute smoothie.

The fundamental tools aimed attheeliminationof dents are the angle grinder, dollies, hammers, and metal and slap files. All these can be purchased from various tool shops in your locality ata reasonable cost.A twisting pattern exists as the secret to eliminating dents even when they appear not utterly round.

Start upon the exterior and use the bowl-shaped side of the dolly and the curved side of the hammer in a rounded motion till you reach the middle. Then, gather up the metallic bits starting with the lowest dent. Generally, any indentation that staysas deep as 1″8 of an inch or so should be resolved to about 80% withthe right side of the hammer and a corresponding dolly.

Next, make a good swing using the hammer to make an even interaction with the board. Remember that how you grip the dolly remains important. Just an eight to a fourth inch in the hollow, away from wherever the hammer hits on its exterior, is at its finest. This allows easy depression removal devoid of having to hit the board so firmly.

YouTube Preview Image

In reality, a mild, bouncing swing of the hammer is good. When the cavity is around 80% removed, change to the method of slapping and filing. A pin-spot welding tool is likewise effective when removing impressions. The pins have different dimensions and mostly arestandardized to join it to metal with no burning. Stick the correct pin within the middle of the hole and activate it. When the dip is almost out, work the pin-weld evenly and run a metal file above it. The file should be eight teeth/inch to work well, as well as cut the metal precisely.

Then, slide it in an X-pattern across the board to shave a reedy metal layer off the pinnacle.This will show the high and low, besides giving you an idea of wherever you stand with the flattening process. If you have to blow more, then it is the correct time. When you find it good, slap it using an 80-grit block paper and verify low and high spots.

Now, if you find this guide quite difficult, then visit http://www.autocareassist.co.uk.Auto Care Assist offers various services, such as classic car restoration in Manchester, car repair in Manchester, clutch replacement in Manchester, brake repair in Manchester, bodywork repair in Manchester, and many more!

To start with, this trick is only for those who are not afraid of welders, grinders and any other tool used in bodywork repair in Manchester. Otherwise, it would be best to call the professionals at Auto Care Assist on0161 274 4830 for assistance. For the brave, here is the secret: It just takes a couple of well-thought-out traditional tricks, mods and methods to gear up your carseparate from the rest.

Take note that factories hold different imports than you have when they create cars. This leaves you with certain panels that arenot as even as they should be, besides generally wanting a great deal of trimming and badging. If you possess a welding tool and not afraid of using it, it is easier to make your car into an absolute smoothie.

The fundamental tools aimed attheeliminationof dents are the angle grinder, dollies, hammers, and metal and slap files. All these can be purchased from various tool shops in your locality ata reasonable cost.A twisting pattern exists as the secret to eliminating dents even when they appear not utterly round.

Start upon the exterior and use the bowl-shaped side of the dolly and the curved side of the hammer in a rounded motion till you reach the middle. Then, gather up the metallic bits starting with the lowest dent. Generally, any indentation that staysas deep as 1″8 of an inch or so should be resolved to about 80% withthe right side of the hammer and a corresponding dolly.

Next, make a good swing using the hammer to make an even interaction with the board. Remember that how you grip the dolly remains important. Just an eight to a fourth inch in the hollow, away from wherever the hammer hits on its exterior, is at its finest. This allows easy depression removal devoid of having to hit the board so firmly.

In reality, a mild, bouncing swing of the hammer is good. When the cavity is around 80% removed, change to the method of slapping and filing. A pin-spot welding tool is likewise effective when removing impressions. The pins have different dimensions and mostly arestandardized to join it to metal with no burning. Stick the correct pin within the middle of the hole and activate it. When the dip is almost out, work the pin-weld evenly and run a metal file above it. The file should be eight teeth/inch to work well, as well as cut the metal precisely.

Then, slide it in an X-pattern across the board to shave a reedy metal layer off the pinnacle.This will show the high and low, besides giving you an idea of wherever you stand with the flattening process. If you have to blow more, then it is the correct time. When you find it good, slap it using an 80-grit block paper and verify low and high spots.

Now, if you find this guide quite difficult, then visit http://www.autocareassist.co.uk.Auto Care Assist offers various services, such as classic car restoration in Manchester, car repair in Manchester, clutch replacement in Manchester, brake repair in Manchester, bodywork repair in Manchester, and many more!

Find more information relating to car servicing manchester, and Clutch replacement manchester here.

Article Source:

eArticlesOnline.com }

Flooding in Slovenia leaves six dead

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Flooding in Slovenia leaves six dead
July 6th, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments

Thursday, September 20, 2007

Six people are confirmed dead after Tuesday’s heavy rains in Slovenia. Up to 300 mm of rain fell in just a few hours across the country, with swollen rivers, torrential streams and landslides sweeping away cars, houses, bridges, and whole sections of roads. In some areas, public services have not yet been restored, and healthcare and drinking water are being provided by mobile units. Some major roads are still closed. The damage includes the destruction of the resistance Hospital Franja, a museum site from the Second World war.

Worst hit was the valley town of Železniki, where three people died, 350 houses were flooded and over a hundred cars were swept away by the swollen river Sora. The dead included a woman who was swept away by the river in her car. The local health facilities and the elementary school are closed. Road communication to several surrounding villages was cut off by landslides. The flood also badly damaged local industry. The lower-lying town of Škofja Loka was also badly hit by the flood. A 31-year-old volunteer fire fighter was killed during the rescue effort in Cerklje.

Other badly affected areas include those along the rivers Sava, Savinja and Dravinja. All three rivers and many of their tributaries overflowed and flooded fields and towns. The low-lying parts of Celje, Laško and Nazarje were flooded by up to 2 meters of water. A 34-year-old man and a 24-year-old woman were killed in Podgorje near Braslov?e when their house was buried in a landslide. Two older people managed to leave the house unharmed.

Damage was widespread across the country and many roads were blocked by landslides. Velenje was cut off from the world for more than a day. The main road connecting the mountainous Bohinj valley to the central part of the country was closed, leaving only the mountain road to Tolmin.

Near the town of Cerkno, which was itself flooded, the museum site of Hospital Franja was nearly completely destroyed. The partisan resistance hospital from the Second World War, situated in a narrow mountain canyon above the town and named after the young doctor who worked at the site, treated hundreds of wounded resistance fighters and remained undiscovered by the Wehrmacht throughout the war. The hospital consisted of 12 wooden cabins and a miniature hydroelectric power plant. The power plant and all but one of the wooden cabins and were swept away by the swollen stream. Hundreds of exhibits, including medicine containers, locally produced medical equipment and an x-ray machine were lost or badly damaged.

The government of Slovenia directed €500,000 from the emergency fund to immediate rescue and repair operations, and has promised to help the affected municipalities and population with funds from the budget. The government has also pledged to rebuild the Hospital Franja museum site.

[edit]

World Summit on the Information Society ends in Tunisia

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World Summit on the Information Society ends in Tunisia
July 6th, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments

Saturday, November 19, 2005

The World Summit on the Information Society, organized by the International Telecommunication Union, concluded on Friday evening, November 18th, in Tunis, the capital of the north African nation of Tunisia. The event’s organizers intended for the event to “put into motion” the plan for Internet financing and governance developed at the 2003 WSIS summit in Geneva, Switzerland.

The summit was marred by criticism of Tunisia for allowing attacks on journalists and human rights defenders to occur in the days leading up to the event. A French journalist for “Libération” was stabbed and beaten by unidentified men after he reported on local human rights protesters. A Belgian television crew was harassed and forced to hand over footage of Tunisian dissidents, while local human rights defenders were roughed up and prevented from organising a meeting with international civil society groups. A representative from the French media watchdog Reporters Without Borders, Robert Menard, was prevented from disembarking from his Air France flight to Tunis to attend the summit.

During the event, representatives from the Global Voices project were menaced by the Tunisian police as they held their session on “Expression Under Repression.” Speaking at the session were Rebecca MacKinnon, Ethan Zuckerman, Nart Villeneuve, Taurai Maduna, Isaac Mao, and Hossein Derakshan, among others. The interaction with the Tunisian police is related by Amanda Michel of the Berkman Center with the description from an attendee as, “[B]efore the break, a phalanx of secret police (ie scary guys in dark suits) showed up. [T]hey filled the hall outside the room, forcing cancellation of the break for fear that we’d not be allowed to re-start.”

Nicholas Negroponte demonstrated the first working prototype of his $100 laptop.